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Cannulated Headless Compression Screw

  • 4100-95

  • CZMEDITECH

  • Stainless Steel / Titanium

  • CE/ISO:9001/ISO13485

  • FedEx. DHL.TNT.EMS.etc

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Product Description

What is Cannulated Headless Compression Screw?

The Headless Compression Screw is a cannulated screw that is used for scaphoid fracture fixation. The screw generates compression across the fracture site prior to being countersunk below the articular surface.


Cannulated Headless Compression Screw specifications

namespecificationsREF(titanium alloy)

Cannulated Headless Compression Screw

3.0*12mmT4100-9501
3.0*14mmT4100-9502
3.0*16mmT4100-9503
3.0*18mmT4100-9504
3.0*20mmT4100-9505
3.0*22mmT4100-9506
3.0*24mmT4100-9507
3.0*26mmT4100-9508
3.0*28mmT4100-9509
3.0*30mmT4100-9510
3.5*14mmT4100-9511
3.5*16mmT4100-9512
3.5*18mmT4100-9513
3.5*20mmT4100-9514
3.5*22mmT4100-9515
3.5*24mmT4100-9516
3.5*26mmT4100-9517
3.5*28mmT4100-9518
3.5*30mmT4100-9519
3.5*32mmT4100-9520
3.5*34mmT4100-9521
3.5*36mmT4100-9522
3.5*38mmT4100-9523
3.5*40mmT4100-9524
4.0*16mmT4100-9525
4.0*18mmT4100-9526
4.0*20mmT4100-9527
4.0*22mmT4100-9528
4.0*24mmT4100-9529
4.0*26mmT4100-9530
4.0*28mmT4100-9531
4.0*30mmT4100-9532
4.0*32mmT4100-9533
4.0*34mmT4100-9534
4.0*36mmT4100-9535
4.0*38mmT4100-9536
4.0*40mmT4100-9537
4.0*42mmT4100-9538
4.0*44mmT4100-9539
4.0*46mmT4100-9540
4.0*48mmT4100-9541
4.0*50mmT4100-9542
4.0*55mmT4100-9543
4.0*60mmT4100-9544
5.0*20mmT4100-9545
5.0*22mmT4100-9546
5.0*24mmT4100-9547
5.0*26mmT4100-9548
5.0*28mmT4100-9549
5.0*30mmT4100-9550
5.0*32mmT4100-9551
5.0*34mmT4100-9552
5.0*36mmT4100-9553
5.0*38mmT4100-9554
5.0*40mmT4100-9555
5.0*42mmT4100-9556
5.0*44mmT4100-9557
5.0*46mmT4100-9558
5.0*48mmT4100-9559
5.0*50mmT4100-9560
5.0*55mmT4100-9561
5.0*60mmT4100-9562
5.0*65mmT4100-9563
5.0*70mmT4100-9564


Actual Picture

Cannulated Headless Compression Screw

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Cannulated Headless Compression Screw: A Comprehensive Guide

Fractures are a common occurrence, and they can happen to anyone, at any time. Fortunately, advancements in medical technology have made it easier to treat such injuries. One of the most innovative solutions is the use of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws (CHCS). In this article, we will provide a comprehensive guide to everything you need to know about CHCS.

Table of Contents

  1. What is a Cannulated Headless Compression Screw?

  2. History and Development of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

  3. Types of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

  4. Indications for Use of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

  5. Surgical Technique for Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

  6. Advantages of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

  7. Potential Complications and Risks

  8. Postoperative Care and Rehabilitation

  9. Research and Clinical Studies

  10. Conclusion

  11. FAQs

1. What is a Cannulated Headless Compression Screw?

A Cannulated Headless Compression Screw (CHCS) is a type of screw used in orthopedic surgery to fix bone fractures. It is designed to provide a more stable fixation than traditional screws while reducing the risk of causing damage to the surrounding soft tissues.

Unlike traditional screws, which have a threaded head that can protrude from the bone, CHCS screws are headless, meaning that they do not have a visible head. Instead, they have a tapered end that compresses the fracture site, promoting bone healing.

CHCS screws are cannulated, meaning that they have a hollow center. This allows for the insertion of a guide wire, which helps to guide the screw accurately into the bone.

2. History and Development of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

The use of compression screws to treat fractures dates back to the early 20th century. However, it was not until the 1980s that cannulated screws were developed.

The development of CHCS screws was a significant advancement in fracture treatment, as they reduced the risk of soft tissue damage and provided a more stable fixation. Since their development, CHCS screws have become increasingly popular in orthopedic surgery.

3. Types of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

There are various types of CHCS screws available, including:

  • Fully threaded screws

  • Partly threaded screws

  • Self-drilling screws

  • Self-tapping screws

Each type of screw has its advantages and disadvantages, and the choice of screw used will depend on the specific case.

4. Indications for Use of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

CHCS screws are used to treat fractures of long bones, such as the femur, tibia, and humerus. They are particularly useful in treating spiral fractures, as they provide a more stable fixation than traditional screws.

CHCS screws are also used to treat nonunions (fractures that have not healed) and malunions (fractures that have healed incorrectly).

5. Surgical Technique for Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

The surgical technique for inserting CHCS screws involves the following steps:

  1. Preoperative planning, including imaging studies to determine the location and severity of the fracture

  2. Anesthesia and positioning of the patient

  3. Insertion of a guide wire into the bone, using imaging guidance

  4. Tapping of the bone to create a path for the screw

  5. Insertion of the CHCS screw over the guide wire, compressing the fracture site

  6. Verification of proper placement using imaging studies

6. Advantages of Cannulated Headless Compression Screws

CHCS screws offer several advantages over traditional screws and other fixation methods. Some of these advantages include:

  1. Reduced risk of soft tissue damage: CHCS screws are headless, which reduces the risk of damage to the surrounding soft tissues.

  2. Increased stability: CHCS screws provide a more stable fixation than traditional screws, reducing the risk of hardware failure and the need for revision surgery.

  3. Minimally invasive: The use of CHCS screws is a minimally invasive procedure, which can lead to faster healing and recovery times.

  4. Greater range of motion: The smaller size of CHCS screws allows for a greater range of motion compared to other fixation methods.

  5. Reduced risk of infection: The hollow center of CHCS screws allows for better irrigation and reduces the risk of infection.

7. Potential Complications and Risks

Like any surgical procedure, the use of CHCS screws carries some risks and potential complications. Some of these include:

  1. Hardware failure: CHCS screws can break or loosen over time, leading to the need for revision surgery.

  2. Malpositioning: Incorrect placement of CHCS screws can result in improper healing or damage to surrounding structures.

  3. Infection: Although rare, the use of CHCS screws can lead to infection.

  4. Nerve or vascular damage: The placement of CHCS screws near nerves or blood vessels can lead to damage.

  5. Allergic reactions: In rare cases, patients may have an allergic reaction to the materials used in CHCS screws.

8. Postoperative Care and Rehabilitation

Postoperative care and rehabilitation play a crucial role in the success of CHCS screw placement. Patients will be instructed to avoid weight-bearing on the affected limb and will require physical therapy to regain strength and mobility.

Rehabilitation typically begins a few weeks after surgery and can last for several months, depending on the severity of the fracture.

9. Research and Clinical Studies

Several clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of CHCS screws in treating fractures. One study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma found that CHCS screws provided better fixation and improved patient outcomes compared to traditional screws.

Another study published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found that the use of CHCS screws resulted in a higher rate of fracture healing compared to other fixation methods.

10. Conclusion

Cannulated Headless Compression Screws are a valuable tool in the treatment of fractures. They offer several advantages over traditional screws and other fixation methods and have been shown to be effective in clinical studies.

As with any surgical procedure, there are risks and potential complications associated with the use of CHCS screws. However, when used correctly, they can lead to faster healing times, reduced risk of infection, and improved patient outcomes.

11. FAQs

  1. How long does it take to recover from CHCS surgery?

Recovery time varies depending on the severity of the fracture and other individual factors. However, most patients can expect to begin rehabilitation a few weeks after surgery and can expect to see improvement over several months.

  1. Can CHCS screws be removed?

In some cases, CHCS screws may be removed if they are causing pain or other complications. However, this decision should be made in consultation with a physician.

  1. Are CHCS screws covered by insurance?

Most insurance plans cover the cost of CHCS screws when they are deemed medically necessary.

  1. What materials are CHCS screws made of?

CHCS screws are typically made of titanium or stainless steel.

  1. Are there any restrictions on activities after CHCS surgery?

Patients will typically be instructed to avoid weight-bearing on the affected limb for several weeks after surgery. Depending on the severity of the fracture, other activity restrictions may apply, and patients should follow their physician's instructions for recovery.


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